How Many Poisonous Snakes Are There In South Carolina?

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South Carolina is home to a variety of snakes, including several species that are venomous. The most common poisonous snakes found in South Carolina include the copperhead, cottonmouth, eastern diamondback rattlesnake, timber rattlesnake, and pigmy rattlesnake. These snakes can be found throughout the state in various habitats, including forests, wetlands, and residential areas. While encounters with venomous snakes are relatively rare, it is important to be aware of their presence and take precautions when exploring the outdoors. If bitten by a poisonous snake, it is crucial to seek medical treatment immediately.


How many snakebite deaths in South Carolina are preventable with timely medical treatment?

According to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, approximately 70-80% of snakebite deaths in South Carolina are preventable with timely medical treatment.


How many snakebite victims in South Carolina suffer long-term health consequences?

According to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, approximately 10-30% of snakebite victims in the state suffer long-term health consequences.


How many venomous snake species are endangered in South Carolina?

There are four venomous snake species in South Carolina that are classified as endangered: the Eastern diamondback rattlesnake, the timber rattlesnake, the pigmy rattlesnake, and the Eastern massasauga rattlesnake.


What is the process for obtaining a permit to keep venomous snakes in South Carolina?

To obtain a permit to keep venomous snakes in South Carolina, you must follow these steps:

  1. Contact the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) to obtain information on the specific requirements for keeping venomous snakes in the state.
  2. Fill out an application for a permit to possess venomous snakes. This application will require information about the species of venomous snake you wish to keep, the intended purpose for keeping them, and the safeguards you have in place to ensure public safety.
  3. Submit the completed application to the SCDNR along with any required fees.
  4. The SCDNR will review your application and may conduct an inspection of your facilities to ensure they meet safety standards for keeping venomous snakes.
  5. If your application is approved, you will be issued a permit to possess venomous snakes in South Carolina.
  6. Be sure to comply with all regulations and conditions outlined in the permit, which may include restrictions on the number and species of venomous snakes you are allowed to keep, as well as requirements for secure housing and handling procedures.
  7. Renew your permit as required by the SCDNR and notify them of any changes in your venomous snake collection or facilities.
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